National & State Suicide Resources

American Association of Suicidology (AAS)
Founded in 1968 American Association of Suicidology promotes research, public awareness programs, public education and training for professionals and volunteers. In addition, AAS serves as a national clearinghouse for information on suicide.

CA Department of Health Care Services-Suicide Prevention Program (SPP) formerly known as Office of Suicide Prevention
The Office of Suicide Prevention was established in 2008 by the former California Department of Mental Health (DMH). It is now the CA Department of Health Care Services-Suicide Prevention Program (SPP). In 2008, DMH published the California Strategic Plan on Suicide Prevention: Every Californian Is Part of the Solution. Click here to view the California Strategic Plan on Suicide Prevention: Every Californian Is Part of the Solution Executive Summary.

MY3 is owned and maintained by Link2HealthSolutions, Inc., the administrator of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. It was created in partnership with the California Mental Health Services Authority and was funded by the California Mental Health Services Act (Prop. 63).

National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention
The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention is the public-private partnership advancing the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (NSSP). Established in September 2010 NAASP’s mission is to advance the NSSP by championing suicide prevention as a national priority, catalyzing efforts to implement high priority objectives of the NSS, and cultivating the resources needed to sustain progress.

National Strategy for Suicide Prevention
The 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention: Goals and Objectives for Actions (184 pp. full report) is designed to be a catalyst for social change with the power to transform attitudes, policies, and services. Representing the combined work of advocates, clinicians, researchers and survivors, the National Strategy lays out a framework for action and guides development of an array of services and programs yet to be set in motion. It strives to promote and provide direction to efforts to modify the social infrastructure in ways that will affect the most basic attitudes about suicide and its prevention, and that will also change judicial, educational, and health care systems.

SAVE (Suicide Awareness Voices of Education)
SAVE was one of the nation’s first organizations dedicated to the prevention of suicide. Their work is based on the foundation and belief that suicide is preventable and everyone has a role to play in preventing suicide. SAVE works at the international, national, state and local levels to prevent suicide using a public health model in suicide prevention; concentrating its efforts on education and awareness.

Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
The Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) provides prevention support, training, and resources to assist organizations and individuals to develop suicide prevention programs, interventions and policies, and to advance the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention.

ZeroSuicide in Health and Behavioral Health Care

ZeroSuicide is a project of Education Development Center’s Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC), and supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The foundational belief of Zero Suicide is that suicide deaths for individuals under care within health and behavioral health systems are preventable. It presents both a bold goal and an aspirational challenge.

The Zero Suicide Initiative is a commitment to suicide prevention in health and behavioral health care systems.

Zero Suicide is a key concept of the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention, a priority of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (Action Alliance), a project of Education Development Center’s Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC), and supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The foundational belief of Zero Suicide is that suicide deaths for individuals under care within health and behavioral health systems are preventable. It presents both a bold goal and an aspirational challenge.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Suicide is a leading cause of death in the US. Suicide rates increased in nearly every state from 1999 through 2016. Mental health conditions are often seen as the cause of suicide, but suicide is rarely caused by any single factor. In fact, many people who die by suicide are not known to have a diagnosed mental health condition at the time of death. Other problems often contribute to suicide, such as those related to relationships, substance use, physical health, and job, money, legal, or housing stress.

Making sure government, public health, healthcare, employers, education, the media and community organizations are working together is important for preventing suicide. Public health departments can bring together these partners to focus on comprehensive state and community efforts with the greatest likelihood of preventing suicide.

The Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network

The Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network (TSPN) is the statewide organization responsible for implementing the Tennessee Strategy for Suicide Prevention as defined by the 2001 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention.

TSPN is a grass-roots association which includes counselors, mental health professionals, physicians, clergy, journalists, social workers, and law enforcement personnel, as well as survivors of suicide and suicide attempts. TSPN works across the state under the direction of our Executive Director to eliminate the stigma of suicide and educate communities about the warning signs of suicide, with the ultimate intention of reducing suicide rates in the state of Tennessee.

Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator

Welcome to the Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator, a confidential and anonymous source of information for persons seeking treatment facilities in the United States or U.S. Territories for substance use/addiction and/or mental health problems.

Stop Bullying.gov

In 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Department of Education released the first federal uniform definition of bullying for research and surveillance.

The core elements of the definition include: unwanted aggressive behavior; observed or perceived power imbalance; and repetition of behaviors or high likelihood of repetition. There are many different modes and types of bullying.

The current definition acknowledges two modes and four types by which youth can be bullied or can bully others. The two modes of bullying include direct (e.g., bullying that occurs in the presence of a targeted youth) and indirect (e.g., bullying not directly communicated to a targeted youth such as spreading rumors). In addition to these two modes, the four types of bullying include broad categories of physical, verbal, relational (e.g., efforts to harm the reputation or relationships of the targeted youth), and damage to property.

Bullying can happen in any number of places, contexts, or locations. Sometimes that place is online or through a cellphone. Bullying that occurs using technology (including but not limited to phones, email, chat rooms, instant messaging, and online posts) is considered electronic bullying and is viewed as a context or location.

Rural Information HUB

Rural Health – Suicide and suicide prevention. Summaries of funding programs are provided by RHIhub for your convenience. Please contact the funder directly for the most complete and current information.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness

NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness.

What started as a small group of families gathered around a kitchen table in 1979 has blossomed into the nation’s leading voice on mental health. Today, we are an association of more than 500 local affiliates who work in your community to raise awareness and provide support and education that was not previously available to those in need.

US Veterans Crisis Line

If you are a Service member or Veteran in crisis or you’re concerned about one, there are specially trained responders ready to help you, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. The Veterans Crisis Line connects Service members and Veterans in crisis, as well as their family members and friends, with qualified, caring VA responders through a confidential toll-free hotline, online chat, or text-messaging service.

Some people feel that there is no way out of their situation. They  have the idea that no matter what they do, no matter what they say, everything would seem to have a negative impact on themselves or to their surroundings. We really do not know what is going on in their minds, but some of them can be a danger to themselves, if not to others.

People who are deeply troubled are prone to develop suicidal thoughts. There are a lot of factors that contribute to feeling hopeless and desperate enough to end one’s life. Depression, separation anxiety, loneliness or fear — these are only some of the reasons why people kill themselves. As they say, “suicide is not chosen; it happens when pain exceeds resources for coping with pain.”

“Suicide doesn’t end the chances of life getting worse, it eliminates the possibility of it ever getting any better.”